Electric vehicles will soon be cheaper than regular cars because maintenance costs are lower, says Tony Seba

All new vehicles would be electric by 2025, due to cost-effectiveness rather than a green revolution, Tony Seba, a serial entrepreneur and author, told a Nomura investment forum. Electric vehicle (EV) performance has been improving so quickly and prices have been falling so fast that the internal combustion engine (ICE) wouldn’t be able to compete for much longer, Seba, the author of “Clean Disruption of Energy and Transportation,” told the Thursday forum.

Read the source article at cnbc.com

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Here’s what automakers mean by ‘lightweighting’

No matter what you drive, the rule’s the same: The more a vehicle weighs, the more energy it takes to move it. That means more fuel, along with more emissions. As federal standards tighten, automakers are putting their vehicles on diets to squeeze as much efficiency from them as possible.

At General Motors, as with other manufacturers, that involves “lightweighting” to bring down the vehicle’s heft, using new materials and different ways of putting cars together.

Read the source article at driving.ca

VW's Diesel Crisis Is Now a Global Threat

Edward Niedermeyer, an auto-industry analyst, is the co-founder of Daily Kanban and the former editor of the blog The Truth About Cars. If Volkswagen was hoping that its $10 billion buyback settlement with U.S. officials would bring some closure to months of hand-wringing over diesel emissions, its timing couldn&apost have been worse. A flood of news over the past week showed that what was once a single company&aposs scandal has grown into a global regulatory crisis.

Read the source article at bloombergview.com

Ford Says Regulatory Scrutiny on Automakers Is Rising Globally

Regulators around the world are getting tougher on automakers after a series of cheating scandals on fuel economy and emissions, with China set to become the strictest, according to Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Officer Mark Fields. “The regulatory environment around the world is becoming more and more strict, particularly on things like greenhouse gases and fuel economy,” Fields told reporters Saturday in Beijing, ahead of China’s biggest auto show that opens next week.

Read the source article at Bloomberg.com

Fields says regulatory scrutiny on automakers is rising globally

Mark Fields: “The regulatory environment around the world is becoming more and more strict.” Mark Fields: “The regulatory environment around the world is becoming more and more strict.” BEIJING — Regulators around the world are getting tougher on automakers after a series of cheating scandals on fuel economy and emissions, with China set to become the strictest, said Ford CEO Mark Fields.

Read the source article at Front Page

Multiple Automakers Used ‘Thermal Window’ Loophole To Circumvent European Emissions Regulations: Report

Yesterday we reported on a 630,000-vehicle recall in Germany after testing revealed that automakers were taking advantage of a “legal loophole.” Now we have a little more information on that loophole, as a new Reuters report says that the loophole has to do with preventing rust in the catalysts. German authorities conducted emissions testing on 53 diesel vehicles, finding that many Mercedes, VW, Porsche, Audi and Opel cars produced excessive pollution.

Read the source article at Jalopnik

Mitsubishi’s woes could extend to i-MIEV; US government investigating | LeftLaneNews

The woes of Mitsubishi Motors continues to grow in the wake of a revelation that the automaker has been fudging fuel economy numbers. Now the US government is “seeking information” in regards to cars imported to the United States. On Wednesday Mitsubishi admitted to over-inflating tire pressures while undergoing Japanese fuel economy tests, resulting in artificially improved numbers by as much as 10 percent.

Read the source article at LeftLane News